Online Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Summer Course Dates:

Eight-week courses (U8) begin on June 7 and end on July 30.

Fall Course Dates:

First eight-week courses (F1) begin on August 23 and end on October 14. 

Second eight-week courses (F2) begin on October 18 and end on December 9. 

Full semester courses (FF) begin on August 23 and end on December 9.

Tuition and Fees: For Summer 2021, tuition is $390 per credit hour, plus an additional $70 technology fee per credit hour. For Fall 2021, tuition is $400 per credit hour with not technology fee. All courses are 3 credit hours unless noted.

Application Process: Apply online (no fee) at www.mckendree.edu/apply

Questions: Please email online@mckendree.edu or call 618-407-3106, 502-797-4380 or 1-833-317-7236

 

ACC 205 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (3)

Introductory financial accounting course emphasizing the concepts and procedures used to generate financial statements for external users. Areas studied include: information processing, accounting for specific balance sheet and income statement accounts, the cash flow statement, and financial statement analysis.

 

ACC 220 ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

Provides a conceptual foundation in accounting systems and control. Study of business processes and use of information technology, focusing on Intuit Quickbooks and Microsoft Excel. Topics include transaction cycles, internal control, entering transactions, and preparing financial statements using information technology. Emphasis on internal control. Prerequisites: ACC 205, CSI 120.

 

ACC 230 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3)

Introduction to accounting analysis and reporting for management use. This course includes discussion of cost behavior, short-term and long-term decision making, budgeting, managerial performance evaluation, cost-volume-profit analysis, and variance analysis. Prerequisite: ACC 205.

 

ACC 305 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I(3)

Topics include the history and development of generally accepted accounting principles, accounting information systems, study of the balance sheet and income statement accounts, time value of money, inventory valuation techniques, cash and receivables, and statement of cash flows. Prerequisites: ACC 205, 220.

 

ACC 306 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II(3)

A more thorough examination of the various aspects of property, plant, and equipment; depreciation and depletion, intangible assets, current liabilities and contingencies; long term liabilities, stockholders’ equity, earnings per share, and investments. Emphasis on practical application of the theory associated with these topics. Prerequisite: ACC 305

 

ACC 307 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING III (3)

Topics include revenue recognition, accounting for income taxes, pension and postretirement benefits, leases, changes and error corrections, disclosure, and additional concepts associated with the statement of cash flows. Emphasis is placed on the students’ ability to apply theoretical concepts to practical situations. Prerequisite: ACC 306. 

 

ACC 330 MANAGERIAL COST ACCOUNTING (3)

Topics include managerial report generation and analysis with written communication. Includes use of computer models for problem solving, quantitative and qualitative analysis, including behavioral issues. capital budgeting, tactical decision making, and operational control. Prerequisites: ACC 220, 230, MGT 204.

 

ACC 401 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING (3)

Theory and problems involved in preparation and interpretation of consolidated statements and may include additional topics such as trusts, estates, and partnerships. Also included are segmental and interim financial reports and accounting for multinational firms and foreign transactions. Prerequisite: ACC 306.

 

ACC 421 AUDITING (3)

A study of the principles and procedures used by certified public accountants and internal auditors in the examination of financial statements and systems of internal control. Areas emphasized include the role of risk assessment, auditing standards, audit reports, auditor legal liability, and professional ethics. Prerequisite: ACC 306

 

ACC 431 RESEARCH IN ACCOUNTING THEORY (3)

An accounting capstone course focusing on the history, controversial issues, and current developments in accounting theory. The research process and information literacy are emphasized. Students develop and present an individual research project that demonstrates synthesis of accounting theory and practice to a specific accounting topic. Prerequisite: ACC 307.

 

ART 100 ART APPRECIATION (3)

This survey course explores visual art forms and their cultural relationships across history. With an emphasis on the foundations of visual art, students develop an awareness and appreciation for the history, function, techniques, and purposes surrounding visual art. Students will gain an understanding of visual vocabulary in an effort to describe, analyze, and interpret art against its political, social, and cultural backdrops.

 

BIO 101 INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY (4)

This course is intended for the non-science major. The principle objectives are to prepare students to be scientifically literate citizens and to introduce them to major themes in the biological sciences. This includes principles of genetics and inheritance, the impact of biotechnology on society, mechanisms of evolutionary change, and principles of ecology and the connectedness of life. This course meets for three hours of lecture per week and one three-hour laboratory per week. A student must pass the laboratory portion of any science course to pass the entire course.

 

BIO 308 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I (5)

This course provides an in-depth study of the muscular, skeletal, nervous, endocrine, and reproductive systems. For each organ system, anatomy, physiology, and role within the whole organism are discussed concurrently. Gross anatomy is explored in lab utilizing dissections and/or models; characteristics of tissues and cells is investigated with microscopy. Function of each organ system is investigated in lab by physiological observation and experimentation. This course satisfies the organismal elective area. This course meets for three hours of lecture per week and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: BIO 101 or 110. A student must pass the laboratory portion of any science course to pass the entire course.

 

BUS 303 BUSINESS LAW I (3)

An introduction to law including: its foundations, torts, and topics relevant to business. Most of the course is spent studying modern contract law and its effect on business practice.

 

BUS 305 LEGAL ASPECTS OF SPORT MANAGEMENT (3)

An examination of the law related to practices of sport management. Examples of topics to be included are agency, contracts, antitrust, labor, torts, workers’ compensation, and intellectual property. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: SPM 320.

 

BUS 310 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS FOR BUSINESS DECISIONS (3)

A course designed to provide the student with the quantitative tools necessary to make effective business decisions. Areas of study will include statistical and operations research techniques for decision making and predictive modeling. Prerequisite: MTH 170.

 

BUS 324 BUSINESS ETHICS AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (W) (3)

This course addresses the importance of ethical considerations in business decisions. Topics include: schools of ethical thought, the impact of competing stakeholder groups, and the creation of an ethics enforcement systems. Students will refine their personal ethical standards and learn to apply ethical decision models to the resolution of business dilemmas. Prerequisite: MGT 204 and MKT 205 or instructor consent.
 

BUS 330 PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3)

This course develops the competencies and skills for planning and controlling projects and understanding interpersonal issues that drive successful project outcomes. Focusing on the introduction of new products and processes, students will examine the project management life cycle, define project parameters, identify and analyze matrix management challenges, gain effective project management tools and techniques, and understand the role of a project manager.

 

BUS 410 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

Provides an overview of management information systems. MIS explores the structure of information systems needed to support routine processes and major organizational functions, and to make informed management decisions. It emphasizes the digital integration of the firm through enterprise applications, i.e., supply chain management, customer relations, enterprise systems, and the development of knowledge. Prerequisite: MGT 204, CSI 120, or equivalent.

 

BUS 450 BUSINESS STRATEGY AND POLICY (3)

A capstone course designed to further develop the business student’s decision making ability through the use of case studies, exercises, and simulations. Students are asked to identify problems, develop alternative solutions, and present the results. Prerequisites: Completion of the Business Core and Senior standing or instructor consent.

 

CBD 330 INTRODUCTION TO CYBER DEFENSE (3)

In this course, students learn the basic concepts, terminology, and technologies that comprise the field of cyber defense. Students in this course are introduced to topics such as risk/threats in the cyber environment, threat assessment, cyber-defense terminology, cyber-defense planning, and general cyber-defense management. Prerequisite: CSI 130.

 

CBD 332 CYBER DEFENSE NETWORKING (3)

Students in this course explore the fundamentals of network security and related topics. This course facilitates an understanding of the fundamentals of networking configurations and protocols, as well as threat and vulnerability recognition and mitigation from the perspective of the CIA triad: eavesdropping (confidentiality), man-in-the-middle (integrity), and denial-of-service (availability). Students will also engage in applied learning to reinforce lectures and provide practical implementation experience. Prerequisite: CSI 130, CBD 330.

 

CBD 334 LEGAL AND ETHICAL ENVIRONMENT OF CYBER DEFENSE (3)

In this course, students are exposed to the legal and ethical issues that relate to the field of cyber defense. In addition to learning about the laws and policies that shape and govern this field, students will also study topics such as General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the protection of information/intellectual property, ethical hacking, and privacy concerns in public and private organization. Prerequisite: CSI 130, CBD 330.

 

CBD 336 CYBER RISK MANAGEMENT AND MITIGATION (3)

This course explores cyber defense from a risk-management perspective. Students focus on strategies for assessing risk, as well as for implementing effective and proactive risk-management practices and riskmitigation measures. Topics in this risk assessment include risk analysis, risk mitigation, risk management, networking components and Virtual Private Networks (VPN). Students will also learn about the resources and methods used for information assurance. The student will apply this knowledge to develop an assessment methodology and strategies for managing and mitigating risks in the cyber environment. Prerequisite: CSI 130, CBD 330.

 

CBD 451 PRACTICUM IN CYBER DEFENSE (3)

This is the capstone course for the major in cyber defense. This is an applied, lab-based class that provides students an opportunity to apply the knowledge they have learned in a simulated environment. They will assess and identify vulnerabilities, threats, and suspicious activity in information technology systems and networks; assess the implication of threats; and implement management and mitigation responses to protect and defend sensitive information and intellectual property. Prerequisite: CSI 130, CBD 330, 332, 334, CBD 336.

 

COM 100 FUNDAMENTALS OF COMMUNICATION (3)

This course provides an introductory survey of communication topics such as nonverbal communication, interpersonal communication, small group communication, and public speaking. The course is designed to help students understand and apply basic communication theories and skills.

 

COM 310 BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATIONS (3)

This course provides students with knowledge of and practice in the varied presentational skills required in the workplace. Students gain experience in presenting briefings, proposals, and group project reports. Prerequisite: CoM 220 or instructor consent.

 

CSI 120 COMPUTER CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS (3)

This course is intended to provide students with a general perspective on computers and their role and other technology related areas. The course provides an introduction to various common software packages (for example: word processors, spreadsheets, and presentation graphics), a history of computers, basic hardware components, commonly used number systems, logic, and algorithmic development. The course includes a required 2 hour laboratory component.

 

CSI 130 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTING I (3)

An introduction to computing, programming, and problem solving. Topics to be discussed include computer organization, data and information processing, computer networks, user interfaces, professional disciplines in computing, basic programming, and software design techniques. Primary emphasis is on problem solving with computers. This course includes a required 2-hour lab meeting per week. Prerequisite of high school algebra proficiency or a co-requisite of MTH 131, 133, or 210.

 

CSI 215 INTRODUCTION TO DATABASES (3)

This course covers the relational model, relational algebra, and SQL. In addition, the course covers relational design principles based on dependencies and normal forms. Additional database topics from the design and application-building perspective will also covered. Prerequisite: CSI 130.

 

CSI 230 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTING II (3)

An introduction to software design techniques necessary for writing programs of moderate complexity. The course provides thorough coverage of control structures, functions, and arrays. File input and output, pointers, and recursive functions are introduced. Primary emphasis is on object-oriented programming including the development of classes, inheritance, operator overloading, and polymorphism. This course includes a required 2-hour lab component. Prerequisite: CSI 130.

 

CSI 235 MATHEMATICS OF COMPUTING (3)

This course covers mathematical topics necessary for understanding concepts in computer science. Topics include sets, relations, functions, Boolean algebras, switching circuits, number theory, induction, recursion, solving recurrences, introduction to pseudo-code, probability, elementary counting techniques, and graphs. May not be taken for credit towards a major in mathematics. Pre/co-requisite: CSI 130.

 

CSI 300 COMPUTER ORGANIZATION AND ARCHITECTURE (3)

This course concentrates on the relationship between computing hardware and machine language instruction sets as well as introductory digital electronics. The course examines logic gates, machine language, and assembly language. Students will also study digital electronics and computer circuit design with small and medium scale integrated circuits. Several computer systems and microprocessors are used as examples. Prerequisite: CSI 230.

 

CSI 315 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3)

This course presents concepts, methodologies, and tools required for the successful analysis, design, and implementation of today’s information systems. The entire system development life cycle will be covered. In addition, both structured and object-oriented techniques will be presented. Prerequisites: CSI 215, 230.

 

CSI 320 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT (W) (3)

This course emphasizes special management considerations as they relate to data processing environments. Types of data processing organizations and options for their internal structure will be addressed. Internal functions and related aspects of data processing from planning through the life cycle of an automated facility are addressed. Prerequisite: MGT 204.

 

CSI 337 INFORMATION SECURITY (3)

This course will provide an introduction to basic information security principles and practices. Topics covered will include the CIA (confidentiality, integrity, and availability) model, risk management, access controls, authentication models, intrusion detection, and vulnerabilities. In addition, basic legal and social issues will also be covered. Prerequisite: CSI 230.

 

CSI 369 SOCIAL, LEGAL, AND ETHICAL ISSUES OF COMPUTING (W) (3)

This course addresses the ethical, legal, and social issues which affect those involved in modern computing. Specific topics will vary from semester to semester but general topics will include issues of privacy, security, and crime as they relate to computing. Prerequisite: Minimum of 12 hours of completed units in CSI or instructor consent.

 

CSI 417 PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3)

This course will cover topics and skills that are necessary for the successful management of today’s complex information technology projects. Scheduling, cost control, and scope management will each receive extensive coverage. In addition, team building, risk management, and procurement activities will also be covered. Prerequisites: MgT 204 and either CSI 120 or CSI 130.

 

CSI 450 COMPUTER NETWORKING AND COMMUNICATIONS (3)

This course concentrates on typical hardware interfaces, programming methods, and communication protocols. Topics considered in detail include electrical interfaces, data transmission, protocol basics, LAN’s, WAN’s, bridged networks, interworking, and application support. Prerequisite: CSI 300 or instructor consent.


 

CSI 497 SENIOR SEMINAR I (3)

This capstone course combines with CSI 498 and requires that students design and define a project. Projects will involve current topics in computing and information science and incorporate material from several of the courses required for their major. Projects will be researched and documented. Each student will lead a class discussion and make a presentation about their project proposal. other current topics related to computing and information science as well as careers in those areas are presented. Prerequisites: Senior standing in Computing and 21 CSI credit hours.

 

CSI 498 SENIOR SEMINAR II (3)

This capstone course combines with CSI 497 and requires that students implement a project that was defined in the previous course. Projects will involve current topics in computing and information science and incorporate material from several of the courses required for their major. Projects will be researched and documented with a formal paper completed at its conclusion. Each student will lead a class discussion and make a formal presentation about their project. other current topics related to computing and information science as well as careers in those areas are presented. This course will concentrate on the definition and design of the project to be implemented. Prerequisite: CSI 497.

 

ECO 211 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (3)

Analysis of individual decision making and the firm’s decision making regarding the allocation of resource inputs and pricing of outputs.

 

ECO 212 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (3)

Introduction to major areas of macroeconomic theory and policy. Topics include: national income, fiscal policy, monetary policy, international trade, and economic growth.

 

ECO 320 ECONOMICS OF SPORT (3)

A course in the principles of the economics of sport. Typical topics include the relationship of sports to the economy; an examination of demand, revenue, and profit; the market for sports broadcast rights; franchise issues; athlete pay; and labor disputes. Prerequisite: ECO 211.

 

EDR 410 ADOLESCENT LITERATURE (3)

This course is designed to provide an overview of young adult literature (for ages 12-18). Reading interests are analyzed from the perspective of readers’ development. guidelines are provided for selection, evaluation, and uses of young adult literature in the classroom.

 

EDU 403 MIDDLE SCHOOL: PHILOSOPHY AND PRACTICES (3)

Examines ideas and practices pertaining to middle school teachers. Required course for the Illinois middle school endorsement on elementary and/or secondary license. Focuses on middle school philosophy, curriculum and instruction, and current practices. Includes instructional methods for designing and teaching developmentally appropriate content programs in middle schools including content area reading instruction. Examines organization and scheduling procedures as well as team teaching components. Complements knowledge acquired from methods courses and examines their application to middle school ideas and practices or upper elementary grades and junior high schools. Scheduled visits to area middle schools may be included as part of the course activities. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.

 

EDU 404 EARLY ADOLESCENTS AND SCHOOLING (3)

Focuses on the developmental characteristics of early adolescents and the nature and needs of early adolescents. Includes the advisory role of the middle grade (5-8) teacher in providing appropriate guidance as well as in assessing, coordinating and referring students to health, social services, and other related services. Study the development of youth of the middle school grades (5-8) and ages (10-14). Required course for the Illinois middle school endorsement on elementary and/or secondary license. Complements the knowledge acquired from Education 350 Educational Psychology and Psychology 406 Psychology of the Exceptional Child. Same as PSY 404. Prerequisite for Education majors: Admission to the Teacher Education Program, PSY 153, and junior standing. Each semester. (noTE: EdU 404 meets one of the two I.S.B.E. requirements for the middle school endorsement. PSY 404 may be applied as part of a psychology major or concentration. This cross-listed course cannot be counted for both areas.)

 

ENG 111 ENGLISH I: ACADEMIC WRITING (4)

English 1 assists students in becoming competent academic writers by introducing them to important academic writing conventions, including analyzing and evaluating written texts. By utilizing various rhetorical strategies and applying basic research techniques, students will further develop the important skills entailed in prewriting, drafting, and revising as they write analytical and persuasive papers.

 

ENG 112 ENGLISH II: RESEARCH AND WRITING (4)

English II further prepares students for the types of academic writing expected in college, with emphasis on the development of critical and analytical skills for reading, research, and writing across the disciplines. The course reinforces process approaches to researched writing while continuing to develop skills in writing for multiple purposes, including analysis, evaluation, synthesis, and argumentation. Prerequisite: ENG 111.

 

ENG 237 COMING-OF-AGE LITERATURE (3)

This class examines contemporary coming-of-age novels and short stories written for adults.

 

ENG 238 THE AMERICAN DREAM IN LITERATURE (3)

This course will examine contemporary explorations of the American Dream in novels written in the 20th and 21st centuries, asking students to analyze how authors respond to our evolving definition of the American Dream. The novels will be selected to represent a diverse American society, exploring race, class, and gender.

 

ENG 360 INTERDISCIPLINARY PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL WRITING(3)

This course introduces students to the theories and practices of effective written communication in professional and technical fields. Students will develop skills in document design, use of graphics, and appropriate technical writing styles for print and digital documents. Students will also develop rhetorical strategies for writing for particular audiences. Prerequisites: Eng 111, 112.

 

ENT 301 THEORY OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3)

This course addresses the theory of entrepreneurship. The focus is on three main areas: entrepreneurship basics, the creative process, i.e. the idea, and planning for business. Some of the major concepts discussed are the pros and cons of entrepreneurship, types of entrepreneurship, the definition of an entrepreneur, strategy development, creating a competitive advantage, and financing. Prerequisites: MGT 204, MKT 205, ACC 205.

 

 

ENT 330 PROCESS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3)

This course provides an in-depth discussion and analysis of the process of entrepreneurship. The focus is on two fundamental areas: business formation and the business plan. A thorough examination will be conducted on critical aspects, such as selecting the correct entity, intellectual property rights, legal considerations, and hiring. A comprehensive business plan will be developed based on the business idea of an individual student entrepreneur. The development of the business plan includes guidance on how to present the idea and plan to investors. Prerequisites: ENT 301, ECO 211, BUS 303.

 

ENT 450 ENTREPRENEURSHIP PRACTICUM (3)

This course is designed to provide students with practical experience in an entrepreneurial setting. Through live business scenarios and/or business simulations, students will learn to recognize entrepreneurial opportunities as well as problems that impede the entrepreneurial process. The goal of this course is to help students apply what they learned in ENT 301 and ENT 330 in real-life and/or simulated business scenarios. Prerequisites: ENT 301, 330.

 

ES 110 EARTH AND ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE (3)

This course will cover principles of modern geology and astronomy. Topics will include the origin and structure of the universe, as well as the origin of the solar system. Other topics will include plate tectonic theory, the geological history of the earth, and the fossil records. This course counts as general education, non-lab science and nature credit.

 

FIN 306 CONSUMER FINANCE (3)

A basic course in personal finance. Topics include: financial planning, establishing credit, purchasing a home, and planning an insurance program. Open to all majors. Prerequisite: ECO 211.

 

FIN 308 PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS FINANCE (3)

Basic financial management of the business firm involving procurement, allocation, and control of funds to maximize shareholder wealth. Prerequisites: ACC 205, ECO 211.

 

FIN 320 BUDGETING AND FINANCING OF SPORT (3)

This course examines the principles involving the procurement, allocation, and control of funds used to support sport programs. Prerequisite: FIN 308.

 

HIS 261 UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 1877 (3)

A survey of American history from prehistory through the Civil War.

 

HIS 262 UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1877 (3)

A survey of American history from the Civil War to the present.

 

HPE 158 HEALTH AND WELLNESS (3)

The Health and Wellness course will afford students the opportunity to reinforce the basics in all eight dimensions of wellness for promoting a healthy lifestyle in addition to exploring the most current thinking on health and wellness topics and related controversial issues. Students will learn practical ways in which to integrate positive health and wellness behaviors into their lifestyle to become a healthy student and citizen.

 

HPE 212 DRUG EDUCATION (3)

Examines a variety of teaching strategies and materials appropriate to the teaching of drug and alcohol use and abuse information in grades 6-12. An examination of the drug abuse from psychological, historical, and legal perspectives. The effects of drug use on the health and social function of the individual will be reviewed as well as drug abuse programs, teaching curricula, drug testing, and other related issues. Prerequisite: HPE 158.

 

HRM 360 LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT (3) 

This course focuses on aligning organizational business needs with employees’ competencies, knowledge, and skills, and identifying the gaps, providing learning opportunities that increase employee capability and organizational knowledge. Some of the topics include Human Performance Technology organizational intervention design and implementation approaches, knowledge management, and coaching/mentoring. The course includes application of current federal laws and regulations and proposed changes. Prerequisite: MGT 334.

 

HRM 411 TALENT MANAGEMENT (W) (3) 

This course includes recruiting, selection, hiring, retention of staff, and employee relations. Additional topics covered will be performance management, career development, and the use of metrics to objectively guide the decision-making processes. The course includes application of current federal laws and regulations and proposed changes. This course contains professional writing assignments; such as case study analysis. Prerequisite: MGT 334.

 

HRM 430 BENEFITS AND COMPENSATION (3)

Management and communication of a compensation philosophy in both domestic and global economies. Role of job analysis/job design, market-based pay strategies, analyzing and interpreting salary survey data, internal equity issues, and statutory and voluntary benefits, including laws and regulations. Prerequisite: MGT 334.

 

HRM 440 EMPLOYMENT LAW (3)

Employment law focuses on federal laws, regulations, and executive orders that impact employee/employer relationships. Some of the laws covered are Americans with Disabilities Act, Fair Labor Standards Act, Occupational Safety and Health Act, Civil Rights Act, Affordable Care Act, and Family Medical Leave Act. Students will learn the terminology and application of the laws through case studies. Prerequisite: MGT 334 and BUS 303 or 304.

 

HRM 450 STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT (3)

This course is a culmination of all previous course work designed to incorporate the interrelationship of HR functions, ethics, sustainability, corporate/social responsibility, international HR, and role of HR professional as internal consultant to business. Topics include managing workforce changes, mergers, acquisitions and reductions in force, competitive strategy, HR performance metrics, and organizational effectiveness. The course includes application of current federal laws and regulations and proposed changes. With the instructor’s guidance, the student will develop a project related to the overall environmental context of business. Prerequisites: MGT 314, 334, COM 370, HRM 411, 430, 440.

 

LDR 101 RECOGNIZED LEADERSHIP (3)

This course is designed to offer undergraduate students the opportunity to explore their values, beliefs, and attitudes as a first step toward understanding themselves and their potential for leadership. This course introduces students to the academic study of leadership theory and research.

 

LDR 201 ENGAGED LEADERSHIP (3)

This course aims to help students think critically about what makes for successful leaders and conscientious followers in group settings. Students will focus on making ethical decisions as leaders, problem-solving difficult issues and situations, creating shared meaning, resolving conflict within groups, collaborating with others, and maximizing group effectiveness. The course also allows students to examine how knowledge, attitude, and awareness of themselves as a leader influences group behavior. Prerequisite: LDR 101.

 

LDR 301 ADAPTIVE LEADERSHIP (3)

This course is an opportunity for an in-depth study of current trends and events in leadership, preparing students for adaptive leadership roles in the community and in their professions. An emphasis will be placed on connecting personal leadership experiences to leadership theories and understanding that leadership is more than the exercise of power. This course also features an individual leadership capstone portfolio, where students prepare a culminating project to demonstrate their experiences and growth throughout the Leadership Studies Minor. Prerequisites: LDR 101, 201.

 

MGT 204 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (3)

 A study of successful management and supervisory behaviors of planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling in the business setting. Issues of authority, leadership, decision making, motivation, productivity, and corporate values are explored.

 

MGT 314 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (3)

A review and analysis of psychological and sociological theories, employing a (skills based) approach, and how they relate to organizational settings. Topics include: self-awareness, creativity, motivation, power, conflict, communication, and stress in the corporate world. Prerequisite: MGT 204.

 

MGT 334 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)

Overview of the roles of strategic human resources in the context of the organization including staffing, training and development, employee/labor relations, workplace health, safety and security, total rewards/ compensation, ethical issues, and legislation affecting human resource functions. Prerequisite: MGT 204.

 

MGT 340 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (3)

This class examines how cultural and social values influence management and marketing practices throughout the world. Work related activities, norms, standards, and expectations of the U.S. are compared with those of other countries. Cross cultural business ventures are examined with particular reference to potential influences of the ventures on the cultures involved. Prerequisites: MGT 204 and MKT 205.

 

MGT 354 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS (W) (3)

An in-depth analysis of communication systems in business. The objective is to develop written, oral, and listening skills within the context of acquiring and holding a job. Other topics include resume format, cover letters, and interviews. Prerequisite: MGT 204.

 

MGT 376 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3)

A survey of the primary decision areas critical to the production of goods and services within organizations. Topics include product and process design, quality control, inventory management, and logistics. The differences between operations management requirements of manufacturing and service operations are also examined. Prerequisites: MGT 204, BUS 310.

 

MKT 205 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING (3)

The course focuses on an analysis of the four strategic elements of marketing – product, price, promotion, and distribution – and the environmental factors that affect the market. The basic theories and examples of marketing practices that this course comprises will prepare the student for further study in marketing and other business fields.

 

MKT 305 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (W) (3)

This course examines the purchase decision situation and the processes that influence it. Basic concepts from the field of cognitive psychology form the theoretical foundation of the course. Applications of the theories to the practice of marketing are developed. Prerequisite: MKT 205.

 

MKT 325 SPORT MARKETING (W) (3)

This course explores the world of sport and entertainment marketing, including distribution, pricing, promotion, selling, and product/service management through the creation of a comprehensive marketing plan. Prerequisite: MKT 205.

 

MKT 330 PRINCIPLES OF RETAILING (W) (3)

This course introduces the student to the basic concepts of retail store management. Topics covered include facility and financial management, staffing, location, merchandising, strategies, inventory controls, pricing, and promotion in the retail environment. Prerequisite: MKT 205.

 

MKT 340 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (3)

This class examines how cultural and social values influence management and marketing practices throughout the world. Work-related activities, norms, standards, and expectations of the U.S. are compared with those of other countries. Cross-cultural business ventures are examined with particular reference to potential influences of the ventures on the cultures involved. Prerequisites: MGT 204, MKT 205. Same as MGT 340.

 

MKT 354 ADVERTISING AND PROMOTION (3)

A course focusing on the communications functions of marketing. Topics include public relations, merchandising, sales promotion, advertising management, and marketing communications theory and research. Prerequisite: MKT 205.

 

MKT 410 MARKETING RESEARCH (W) (3)

The course introduces the scientific method as it is applied in marketing. Quantitative and qualitative research methods are studied and an original research project is undertaken. Students gain experience in developing research questions, selecting appropriate methods, using analytical tools, and interpreting and presenting research findings. Prerequisites: MKT 205, 305, 354, MTH 170.

 

MTH 105 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA (3)

This course is for students who have had no more than one year of high school algebra or who have not had mathematics for some time. The course consists of a review of elementary algebra and additional work in linear and quadratic equations, factoring, exponents, polynomials, graphing, and linear systems.

 

MTH 170 STATISTICS (4)

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics, approached through intuition, algebra, and problem solving. Understanding of central concepts and methods is stressed. Practical applications in the fields of social and physical sciences are studied. Real-world problems are solved through use of statistical computer packages such as SPSS, SAS, or MINITAB. Prerequisites: MTH 105 and computer literacy.


MUS 165 MUSIC APPRECIATION

An introduction to music, this course will enable students with various backgrounds in music to listen to music more intelligently. Students will learn about the historical-cultural aspects of music as an art and its development in the great style periods, along with the lives of the leading figures and the world they inhabited. There will be an emphasis on musical styles, forms, and media. This course will encompass music from the medieval period through the twentieth century.

 

NSG 351 HEALTH ASSESSMENT AND PATHOPHYSIOLOGY I (3)

The health assessment portion of the course facilitates the student’s development of the health assessment techniques of interview, inspection, palpation, auscultation, and percussion. Students perform health assessments of the integumentary, hematologic, cardiovascular, and pulmonary systems and build a thorough case history on a client of their choosing. Pathophysiology introduces students to the causes and mechanisms of diseases of the hematologic, integumentary, cardiovascular, and pulmonary systems. Students will recognize the symptoms of diseases in relation to the underlying biochemical, genetic, and metabolic malfunctions. Students will be able to describe the pathogenesis of neoplasms, inflammatory disorders, and disorders of the immune system.

 

NSG 352 HEALTH ASSESSMENT AND PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 2 (3)

The health assessment portion of the course facilitates the student’s development of the health assessment techniques of interview, inspection, palpation, auscultation, and percussion. Students perform health assessments of renal, gastrointestinal, neurologic, and musculoskeletal systems and build a thorough case history on a client of their choosing. Pathophysiology introduces students to the causes and mechanisms of diseases of the renal, gastrointestinal, neurologic, and musculoskeletal systems. Pre/co-requisite: NSG 351.

 

NSG 355 HEALTH POLICY AND ECONOMICS (3)

This course introduces students to basic concepts and principles of health policy, healthcare economics, and healthcare delivery in the climate of managed care. Public and private funding of healthcare will be discussed. Students will examine the history and evolution of healthcare in America and the impact of the current system on cost, availability, access, and quality of healthcare. The United States system of healthcare delivery will be compared to those of other nations. Future trends in healthcare will be discussed.

 

NSG 366 CONCEPTS IN RESEARCH (4)

The focus of this introductory research course is on the concepts of nursing research. Students are able to describe basic research concepts and techniques and appreciate the ethics of nursing research. Evaluative skills are developed by critiquing current nursing research. Using peer-reviewed research articles, students analyze and summarize nursing research on a selected topic. Pre/co-requisite: MTH 170 or instructor consent.

 

NSG 367 RESEARCH APPLICATION IN PRACTICE (4)

In this writing-intensive course, students will explore evidence-based approaches to frequently encountered clinical questions. Through an in-depth evaluation of current research literature, students investigate evidence-based nursing practice. Using peer-reviewed research articles, students analyze and summarize nursing research on a selected topic. Pre/co-requisite: nSg 366 and MTH 170 or instructor consent.

 

NSG 404 DIVERSITY IN HEALTHCARE DELIVERY (3)

In this course, students develop cultural responsiveness by exploring and analyzing cultural beliefs, attitudes, and values of clients, families, and communities, as well as health care providers. Students will describe the impact of cultural beliefs on health and health care practices, as well as propose strategies to gain trust with the client/family to improve health outcomes. This course also serves to explore epidemiology with underserved and vulnerable populations applied to preserving, promoting, and maintaining the health of the global and diverse populations.

 

NSG 405 ETHICAL/LEGAL ISSUES IN NURSING (3)

In this course, students discuss legal issues impacting current nursing practice. Students explore historical and social factors influencing the development of ethics in nursing practice and analyze ethical problems inherent in contemporary practice of nursing. Students analyze emerging professional roles in nursing, paying particular attention to the advocate component of these roles.

 

NSG 451 CONCEPTS OF POPULATION-BASED CARE (3)

In this course, students develop knowledge of health promotion and disease prevention concepts, as well as differentiate various levels of health care (primary, secondary and tertiary). Factors that influence the health status of groups and communities are examined. Students develop beginning-level skills in community assessment, epidemiological investigation, and community health education. Students complete an in-depth study of the health needs of selected vulnerable populations and groups within the community and develop evidence-based interventions. Students examine the role of the community and public health nurses in a variety of practice settings.

 

NSG 452 PRACTICUM IN POPULATION-BASED CARE (3)

This practicum course is designed to apply principles of community/public health nursing, in caring for individuals, families, aggregates, and populations. Students will engage in interprofessional collaboration with members of a healthcare team in community agencies for the provision of care to individuals, families, and/or aggregates. Pre/corequisite: NSG 451.

 

NSG 471 CONCEPTS OF LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT (W) (4)

This course provides a foundation for students to investigate theories of leadership and management. Students develop strategies in delegation, supervision, management, and leadership. Critical thinking and decision making skills inherent to the professional nurse will be emphasized. Pre/corequisite: NSG 367 and 452.

 

NSG 472 PRACTICUM IN LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT (Cumulative Practicum Experience) (3)

This cumulative practicum course experience provides a foundation for students to apply theories of leadership and management in a preceptor setting. Students implement strategies in delegation, supervision, management, and leadership. Critical thinking and decision making skills inherent to the professional nurse will be synthesized. Pre/co-requisite: All other courses must be completed or in process.

 

PHI 291/391 BIOMEDICAL ETHICS (W, 391 only) (3)

This course explores the ethical implications of recent developments in biological research and medical practice, including experimentation with human subjects, biological engineering, death, transplantation and resource allocation, behavior control, and health care delivery. Students taking this course as PHI 325 will be required to complete a process-oriented major writing project in addition to other required writings. Students may elect to take this course at one level, but not both.

 

PSI 101 AMERICAN POLITICS (3)

A survey course focusing on the development, organization, and dynamics of American political processes and institutions. This course examines how the public, interest groups, the media, political parties, and the constitutional branches of government work together to produce public policies.

 

PSY 153 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Principles and facts necessary for an introduction to the scientific understanding of human behavior on a biological and social-personal level. Provides an introduction to basic concepts necessary for specialization in the field.

 

PSY 201 PSYCHOLOGY CORNERSTONE (1)

This course is an introduction to the psychology major. The class will provide an overview of APA-style writing, service-learning, interviewing skills, subfields of psychology, career opportunities, journal article reading, and psychological research. Prerequisite: PSY 153. Each semester.

 

PSY 259 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY (W) (3)

A study of the development of the individual from infancy through adolescence with emphasis on major developmental theories, specifically as related to psychosexual, psychosocial, cognitive, moral, and physical development. Methodologies in child research are also explored. Requires systematic observation of children and adolescents. Prerequisite: PSY 153. 

 

PSY 301 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS (3)

This course will introduce students to descriptive and inferential statistics used in psychology. Topics will include the interpretation, analysis, and reporting of psychological data. Prerequisite: PSY 201. Each semester.

 

PSY 304 CROSS CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

This course will provide an overview of the impact of cultural effects on human behavior by focusing on similarities and differences from a global perspective utilizing theories of personality. The purpose of this course is to enhance student sensitivity and awareness of diversity aimed at reducing ethnocentric thinking while sharpening critical thinking skills. Prerequisite: PSY 153.

 

PSY 305 FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY (3)

This class provides an overview of forensic, criminal, and legal psychology, including such topics as interrogations, lie detection, forensic identification, profiling, jury selection, eyewitness testimony, and the death penalty. Prerequisite: PSY 153. Spring, annually.

 

PSY 315 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

A study of the development and characteristics of mental disorders such as anxiety disorders, personality disorders, psychotic disorders, somatoform disorders, and mood disorders will be examined. Various treatment modalities will also be considered. Prerequisite: PSY 153.

 

PSY 320 MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY (3)

This class provides an overview of military psychology including such topics as fitness-for-duty evaluations, posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, neuropsychological conditions, substance abuse, and the psychology of terror. In addition, the course will explore psychology careers working with the military. Prerequisite: PSY 153

 

PSY 330 BASIC PRINCIPLES OF APPLIED BEHAVIORAL ANALYSIS (3)

This course is an introduction to the basic principles and procedures of applied behavior analysis (ABA). Research, theory, ethics, and professional practice will also be addressed. Students will be exposed to a range of applications such as autism/developmental disabilities, geriatrics, and business. Successful completion of this course satisfies the educational requirement for credentialing as a registered behavior technician (RBT) by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board. Interested students should see bacb.com/rbt for more information. Same as PSY 330. Prerequisite: PSY 153

 

PSY 370 PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN SEXUALITY (3)

An investigation of human sexual behavior, including but not limited to sexuality in its cultural, biological, and social contexts. Examined will be such topics as conception and contraception, physiological and anatomical factors, sexual dysfunction, and variations in sexual behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 153.

 

PSY 396 RESEARCH METHODS (3)

This course will introduce students to research methods in psychology. Course topics will include searching and reading the research literature, designing studies, analyzing research data, and writing APA style empirical reports. Prerequisite: PSY 301.

 

PSY 398 ETHICS IN RESEARCH AND THERAPY (3)

This course will cover the ethical principles and code of conduct for individuals in various helping professions. Specific topics and case studies will include ethical issues related to competence, human relations, privacy and confidentiality, advertising, record keeping, education and training, research, assessment, and therapy. Ethical codes from the American Psychological Association, American Counseling Association, Behavior Analyst Certification Board, the Association for Applied Sport Psychology, and the American Occupational Therapy Association will be the primary resources. Same as PSY 398. Prerequisite: PSY 153.

 

PSY 401 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

An examination of social interactions, the impact of the group on the individual, and the impact of the individual on the group. Focus is on interpersonal behavior and feelings – liking, love, aggression, conformity, communications and attitude formation, and change. Same as SOC 401. Prerequisite: PSY 153.

 

PSY 405 INDUSTRIAL/ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

This course will provide a study of the application of psychological methods and techniques to the solution of human problems industry and business and includes topics such as behavior in organizations, group behavior, organizational climates, interviewing techniques, motivation, leadership, and employment law. Prerequisite: PSY 153.

 

PSY 450 CLINICAL AND COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Introduction to the various techniques of counseling. Course will include an overview of humanistic, psychoanalytic, behavior, and cognitive therapy approaches. Prerequisite: PSY 315.

 

PSY 465 SPORT AND HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY (3)

This course will cover primary theories and applications in sport and health behaviors. Theories will be drawn from social psychology, health psychology, cognitive psychology, exercise psychology, and sport psychology. Specific topics will include personality characteristics, motivation, goal-setting, attributions, concentration, imagery, aggression, group dynamics, communication and counseling techniques, research methodologies, and behavior modification. Same as PED 465. Prerequisite: PSY 153.

 

PSY 496 SENIOR THESIS (W) (3)

This course will guide students through a senior thesis project involving an independent research project that includes a literature review, research design, implementation of procedures, data collection, data analysis, and reporting of results. Prerequisite: PSY 301, 396.

 

PSY 498 PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR (3)

This course is designed for psychology and biopsychology majors to prepare them for graduate school and for the professional field. Students will make professional plans for entry into graduate school or the workforce. The course will emphasize self-awareness and lifelong learning. Prerequisite: PSY 153 and junior/ senior standing.

 

REL 215/315 RELIGION IN THE UNITED STATES (3)

An overview of the history, character, and variety of religion in the United States. Elements of the course include summarizing historical developments in religion, analyzing constitutional issues regarding the separation of church and state, and examining the distinctive characteristics of denominational and religious groups, including the way they respond to important contemporary issues.

 

SCL 316 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (3)

This course addresses the importance of supply chain management in improving an organization’s profitability and ensuring its survival. It analyzes the relationship to and impact on marketing through the quality of a firm’s products, the firm’s ability to launch new products in a well-timed manner, the pricing of a firm’s product based on its internal cost structure, and its ability to meet demand and generate sales. It addresses key management concepts such as cross-functional teams, team building, decision-making goals, and more. Further, it addresses the supply chain’s contribution to the total value provided to the customer. Prerequisite: MKT 205 or MGT 204.

 

SCL 318 LOGISTICS (3)

This course addresses the importance of logistics in organizing and monitoring storage and distribution of goods. Logistics is a critical component of supply chain management and enables an organization to meet customer requirements through the planning, control, and implementation of the effective and efficient movement and storage of related goods, services, and information from the point of origin to the final destination. In addition, it addresses logistics’ contribution to the total value provided to the customer. Prerequisite: MGT 204 or MKT 205.

 

SOC 150 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (3)

An introduction to sociology with an emphasis on basic concepts and theoretical perspectives, and their application to an understanding of social institutions, processes, and inequalities.

 

SOC 170 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

An introduction to the criminal justice system with an emphasis on the structure and functioning of law enforcement agencies, the courts, and correctional institutions.

 

SOC 220 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY (3)

An introduction to the study of juvenile delinquency including a focus on theoretical background and current trends.

 

SOC 230 POLICE AND URBAN SOCIETY (3)

An examination of the social and historical origins of the police and the changing nature of police organizations in contemporary urban society.

 

SOC 235 CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTIONS (3)

Examination and analysis of contemporary correctional systems. Consideration will be given to such issues as the goals of incarceration, prisoner’s rights, prison violence, treatment and rehabilitation programs, and parole.

 

SOC 270 SOCIAL PROBLEMS (3)

A sociological analysis of the social problems confronting contemporary societies, particularly the United States, and the processes by which they become identified as social problems.

 

SOC 360 RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS (3)

A study of race and ethnic relations in the United States and other countries. The course examines the origins of ethnic conflict, the establishment of ethnic group stratification and the factors that perpetuate ethnic group conflict. Special emphasis will be given to the experience of African Americans. Prerequisite: SOC 150 or instructor consent.

 

SOC 371 SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANCE (3)

An analysis of the sociological theories of deviant behavior. The social construction of deviance will be examined along with an analysis of some of the actions identified as deviant in our society. Prerequisite: SOC 150 or instructor consent.

 

SOC 400 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY (W) (3)

An overview of the development of sociological theory starting with the classical theorists and ending with the work of contemporary sociological thinkers. This course exposes students to theories and theorists who make up the backbone of modern sociology. The course is designed to cultivate in students the analytical skills they will need to be good social thinkers. Prerequisite: SOC 150 or instructor consent.

 

SOC 401 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Same as PSY 401. Prerequisite: SoC 150 or instructor consent.

 

SOC 496 METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH (3)

The first senior capstone course in which students are introduced to social science writing and research skills. This course is designed to cultivate the student’s skills in evaluating the significance of published research findings and in designing original research. Topics include the interdependence of theory and research, hypothesis formation, research design, sampling techniques, and various methods of observation. Students will develop a research proposal. Prerequisite: SOC 400, senior standing, and 12 completed hours in sociology.

 

SPE 400 FOUNDATIONS OF SPECIAL EDUCATION (3)

The study of philosophical, historical, and legal foundations of special education. An investigation of service delivery models and related services for individuals with disabilities across the lifespan.

 

SPE 420 COLLABORATION AND CONSULTATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (3)

The examination of effective collaborative and consultation between special educators and school personnel, community members, families, and learners. The roles and responsibilities of stakeholders on IEP development and implementation will be investigated.

 

SPE 430 LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT (3)

The exploration of theories, research, and methods regarding typical and atypical language development concerning school-aged students with learning difficulties. The role of language in learning and communication as well as cultural and environmental effects on student development are examined.

 

SPM 320 PRINCIPLES OF SPORT MANAGEMENT (3)

The management of sport-related businesses will be examined by applying key concepts of management to sporting events and programs. Topics may include strategic planning; facility and event planning; organizing and delegation; the financing and economics of sport; managing change; behavior in organizations; and quality control. The course may be taught from a case perspective and will cover a broad base of businesses involved in sports. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: MGT 204 or ATH/PED 357.

 

SPM 354 SPORT AND THE MEDIA (3)

This course examines the world of mediated professional, collegiate, and amateur sport. Students will investigate the commercial origins of mediated sport and consider the likely future of the business of sport media and its influence on the sports business.

 

SPM 376 SPORT FACILITIES AND EVENT MANAGEMENT (3)

A course covering the theoretical foundations and practical applications for understanding the management of facilities and sporting events. Topics include key strategies for managing event logistics, critical planning techniques, and applications through the development, planning, execution, and evaluation of a fundraising sporting event. Prerequisite: SPM 320. Prerequisites or concurrent: ECO 320, FIN 320.

 

SPM 470 INTERNSHIP IN SPORT MANAGEMENT (3)

Internship in sport management will focus on experiences that enable the student to synthesize and apply knowledge from the core and specialized courses. Prerequisites: Junior standing and SPM 320.

 

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